Tag Archives: Tests

Selenium Basics for Java is Coming Soon!

In 2016, I published my first course—Automated Testing Using Selenium WebDriver—on Udemy. With that course, my intent was to provide an intermediate level introduction to Selenium WebDriver. I decided to further differentiate it from other courses by working in both C# and Java. While this succeeded in showing that it is easy to apply the concepts taught in multiple languages, I fear that it could be confusing for students that are not experienced in development. This is where my new course will come in.

Students will be required to have a basic understanding of development concepts and Java, but I will be covering the additional technologies and concepts used in greater detail. From installing an IDE and using Git through running tests using a Selenium Grid, my new course will provide you with the foundation you need to become successful in your automation endeavors.

Topics to be covered include:

  • Installing an IDE
  • Installing browser drivers
  • Creating your first Selenium WebDriver test
  • Locating web elements on a page
  • Waiting for web elements
  • An overview of the Page Object Model
  • Running tests against a Selenium Grid
    • Local Dockerized
    • BrowserStack
    • Sauce Labs
    • Testing Bot
  • Other tips, tricks, and concepts for writing great automation

The following is a sample video showing how to setup a Selenium Grid using Docker and Docker-Compose on an Ubuntu virtual machine. This lesson will be part of the Selenium Grid section of the course.

Establishing a Selenium Grid Using Docker and Docker-Compose from Shawn Conlin on Vimeo.

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Be An Eternal Student

No, I’m not talking about spending your entire life jumping from one major to another so you don’t have to graduate. When I say, “Be an eternal student.”, I am advising you to keep learning throughout your life both actively and passively. Don’t let opportunities pass you by. Just because you don’t need to know something right now doesn’t mean that it won’t come in handy later.

One question I get from many people is how I know all of the things I do. I tell them that I just pick it up as I go. Growing up, I was surrounded by mechanics, electricians, carpenters, and other tradesmen. If they needed help, or were helping me, I paid attention and picked up some tricks from them that help me around the house today. With my career, it’s been a bit different. Until recently, I didn’t have a lot of computer people around to talk to so I had spend a lot of time tinkering on my own and doing research. I learned a lot of ways not to do things; I learned some bad habits; and I gained some excellent insight into how our magical toys work from the ground up.

Aside from the hands-on/trial and error approach, I have also invested a significant amount of time reading, watching videos, and taking courses on various topics. Usually I try to focus on things I am either actively working on or expect to in the near future, but sometimes I throw in something brand new or just plain fun to keep me excited about learning. Recently I did this by taking all of the courses in the Docker Path on Pluralsight.com. While I started the courses for fun, I quickly found that what I was learning could be implemented in my current projects, which was an added bonus since I get to practice what I learned and improve my working environment.

It has been experiences like that and some unpleasant bills, replacing things I didn’t know how to fix, that helped me realize the importance of not growing stale or letting my aptitude for learning atrophy because I already know how to do my job. I was also lucky to have grown up around other perpetual students who gave me a solid understanding of how to acquire knowledge. I have found that the keys to learning are very simple:

  1. Find something you are curious about or need to learn.
  2. Gather resources that cover the topic.
    1. Talk to people who already do or know what you need.
    2. Read books and articles about the topic.
    3. Watch videos about it.
    4. Look for someone teaching a course that you can sign up for.
    5. Experiment on your own.
  3. Do something with what you have learned.
    1. Complete a project using what you learned.
    2. Share what you learned with someone else.
  4. Appreciate yourself for learning something.
  5. Repeat.

If that sounds easy, that’s because it is most of the time. I use this approach in my daily life for everything from plumbing to performance testing applications. Granted I will never be a master plumber (it just isn’t my calling) but I also don’t need to call one when I need to unclog a drain or replace a faucet. When it comes to computers and software, there is always something new to learn regardless of your level of mastery. This is part of the reason it is important to be an eternal student. If being armed with new tools and ideas isn’t enough to fuel your desire to learn, remember that once you stop growing you begin to become stale and obsolete. Don’t let your potential sit idle. Take the time and spend the effort to find out exactly what you are capable of. You might even find out that you can do anything you set your mind to.


I have never let my schooling interfere with my education – Mark Twain

An Overview of the Selenium Suite

First Things First

For those unfamiliar with Selenium, it is a suite of open-source browser automation tools consisting of three main products: Selenium IDE, Selenium Server, and Selenium WebDriver. Selenium IDE is a Firefox plugin that can be used to record and playback tests. Selenium Server is a java application that is used to control browsers on remote machines and/or to create what is called a Selenium Grid. The final component of the suite is Selenium WebDriver, which is a browser automation API designed to create tests or perform other required tasks. Each of the suite components serves a specific purpose in a web tester’s toolbox although all of them may not be needed within an organization.

Continue reading An Overview of the Selenium Suite