Category Archives: DIY

Making a Bow Stringer

The kindest thing an archer can do for his bow is to use a bow stringer. Aside from making it easier to string the bow, the stringer allows for applying even pressure on the limbs during stringing so there is less chance of breaking or damaging the bow. This article will explain how to make a stringer that will work on most bows. The stringer is made up of three parts, the pocket, the saddle, and the cord. The function of each part is explained at the end of the article.

To make a simple stringer you will need the following:

· a length of cord 7-8’ long ( I use 8’)

· a scrap of leather or suede at least 5 inches square

· a hole punch

· a rivet (not a pop-rivet) or heavy waxed thread and needle

Figure 1: Leather Tab Patterns
Figure 1: Leather Tab Patterns
You will need to cut two shapes for the leather (see diagrams). The first piece will be used to make the pocket. This piece is shaped like a “T” and measures 4.5” for the top and 5” for the body. The second piece should be 3” long and 1” wide. I usually round the short edges. Once these are cut you are ready to begin assembly.

You will need to punch holes in the ¼” from each of the sides of the saddle. The holes should be large enough to fit your cord through. The number holes required for the “T” depends on whether you use a rivet or thread. If using thread, you will only need one hole, large enough for the cord to pass through twice, punched ¼” from the bottom of the “T”. The diagram shows the single hole and the approximate holes for the rivet.

Figure 2: How to fold the pocket tab
Figure 2: The Pocket

To make the pocket you will need to fold the top of the “T” over twice and then fold the flaps under so the overlap. You will then secure the bottom three layers; the two flaps and “T” body. You should now have a pocket with a loop above it (see diagram).You can now run your cord and complete the stringer

Start running the cord into the “T” with the pocket on top. The cord should pass through the hole from the top; then through the loop (pictured on the left above), and then back through the hole from the bottom. Once the cord is run, secure the strand together with a knot. The saddle is strung by running the cord up through the first hole, down through the second, and securing the cord together with a knot that will not slip. You should leave some room in the loop so it will slip over the bow without too much trouble.

Figure 3: A completed bow stringer
Figure 3: A Completed Bow Stringer

 

 

 

You now have a bow stringer, but do you know how to use it? If not read on and I will offer a quick lesson in stringing your bow. Hold the bow so the string hangs beneath it and slip the pocket of the stringer over the end that already has the string in place. Now slip the saddle over the other end and position it just behind the other loop in the bowstring. Place your foot on the stringer cord and pull up on the handle of the bow; the bow will bend into shape. While holding it in position, slip the loose loop down into position. Your bow is now strung. You should verify that both ends of the string are seated correctly before drawing the bow.

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Outdoor Games Played in Medieval Times and Earlier

Overview:

Finding something to do at an event when you’re too young to take part in many activities can be difficult. In this class, we will learn some games that are easy and appropriate for events. This isn’t as difficult as you might expect, in fact you may already know several of the games. Here is the list:

  • Hopscotch
  • Hoodsman’s (Blind Man’s) Bluff / Jingling
  • Barley Break
  • How Many Miles to London?
  • Bowls/Bocce/Boules

Hopscotch:

Hopscotch dates back to the Roman occupation of Britain. The first thing to be done is to draw a course, several common court styles are seen below.

Each player then chooses a marker, usually a stone. Play begins with the first player tossing his stone into the first space. If the stone lands completely within the designated square, the player proceeds to hop through the course. A player can only have one foot in any given square, so single squares must be balanced and double squares (side by side) are straddled. While hopping, the player should alternate the foot he lands on for each square. Any space not marked with a number, ie London, Home, etc., are considered rest squares and can be landed in any fashion.

When the player reaches the top of the court, he then turns around and comes back, collecting his marker along the way. Play then continues with the player tossing his marker into the second square and so on.

If a player fails to toss his marker into the correct square or if it touches a line the players turn ends. The same is true if the player steps on a line, misses a square, or loses his balance and falls.

The first player to complete the course for each numbered square wins.

Hoodsman’s Blind / Jingling:

Hoodsman’s Blind is known today as Blind Man’s Bluff. The person who is “It” is blindfolded or hooded and must try to catch any player that ventures too close. The other players see how close they can get to “It” without getting caught. The last person caught is “It” for the next game.

Jingling is the reverse of Hoodsman’s Bluff. All of the players are blindfolded except “It”. “It” is given a string of bells and the players must try to catch him. The person who catches “It” is “It” for the next game.

Barley Break:

The game starts by marking an area on the ground by drawing a circle or other shape. “It” cannot leave this area. The players must try to run through the area without getting tagged. If a player is tagged, they must join hands with “It” and help to catch the other players. As more players get tagged, they join onto the end of the line. Only those at the ends of the line can tag a player. Those in the middle can however help to “net” the player as they try to run through. The last person caught is “It” for the next game.

How Many Miles to London?:

This game begins with “It” being blindfolded. The other players then stand in a line and ask “It” for directions. “It” tells them how many steps to take forward backward, left, or right they must go. Then “It” is led to the starting point and must follow his own directions. When “It” has reached the final destination, he must try to touch another player. The other players may duck or sway to avoid being touched, but they cannot move their feet. If a player is tagged, then he is the next “It” otherwise “It” must try again.

Bowls/Bocce/Boules:

This game has many names of which I have mentioned three. Each variation has minor adjustments in the rules, but essentially are the same. The equipment required for the game is 1 small white ball (about 1 – 1 ½” in diameter) and 2-4 balls of about 3” diameter for each player. The field is a flat stretch of ground generally 10’ wide by 60’ long (the distance can vary depending on the age and skill of the players).

Play starts by throwing the small white ball known as a “Jack”, “Pallino”, or “Cochonnet”. The ball must land at least halfway up the designated field to be in play. The players then take turns trying to roll their balls closest to the “Jack”. When a player succeeds in getting his ball closest, his turn ends. If a player runs out of balls before getting “Best Ball” then they must wait while the other players attempt to improve their positions.

A player can get “best ball” in several ways. First they can simply roll their ball closest to the jack. He could also use his ball to hit another player’s ball away or one of his own closer. The player can also hit the jack causing it to move away from the other players’ balls.

At the end of each round, the player whose balls are closest gets one point for each ball nearer to the jack than any other players’. Games are usually played until a score of 15 is reached.

Building a Low-cost Video Recording Booth (High Tech Blanket Fort)

Tools Required:

Hacksaw
Measuring Tape or yard stick

Materials (per wall):

3 – ½” PVC pipes (10’ each)
6 – ½” PVC elbow connectors
4 – ½” PVC Tee connectors
2 – Spring-loaded Clamps (Optional)
3 – clamp lights (Optional)

I purchased 2 8.5” lights for in front of me and a 5.5” for filling behind me

1 – twin size blanket

Instructions:

  1. Cut the 10’ PVC pipes into three 3 foot sections and one 1’ section each
  2. Cut one of the 3’ sections into 1’ pieces.
  3. Assemble two 6’ upright poles by connecting two 3’ foot pipes with a tee connector for each one.
  4. Put elbows on either end of a 3’ pipe and set it aside. This will be the top bar.
  5. Lay the side poles down with the Tees facing each other. Insert a 3’ pole into the tee connectors to serve as a brace. You assembly should now look like an H.
  6. Now take the top bar and fit it on the top of the poles.
  7. Place two elbows on each of the remaining 3’ pipes and set them aside
  8. Make two 2’ pipes using 4 1’ sections and 2 tee connectors
  9. Assemble a rectangle using the two 2’ pipes and the 3’ pipes with the elbows.
  10. The final step is place the upright poles into the tee connectors in the center of the 2’ sides of the base.
  11. Use clamps or lights to attach the blanket to the frame

I hope these instructions are useful and make sense. I am including a picture of one of my frames. This one is a little different than the instructions because I decided to add an extension to the top rather than having a full rectangle for the base.

Be creative and build what you need. I added another pole  and a 3-way connector to support the corner and connected the two walls so I could completely enclose the area rather than just having separate screens.