Testing Is Overrated

As I sit here on the morning of this sunny April 1st, I find myself thinking about the actual importance of testing. We’ve all heard the speeches from QA about how important their job is to the company and the product. How they keep the developers honest and reduce the risk of bugs reaching the customers. Seriously? All they do is hold up release while complaining that some obscure path through the product results in a 5 second delay every 50th time it is performed. Who needs that? The project team certainly has better things to do than listen to that kind of nit-picking.

Now I suggest you think about how much time we can save on projects if we can eliminate the testing phases. In some companies, testing can take up half the project because some module changed and now we have to go through regression testing. As if the developers didn’t already make sure it worked. Of course, the saving for some companies won’t be as significant since they are already practicing the superior process of using hard dates that result in QA only being able to look at the product for a day or less before going live. In today’s fast moving environment, every second counts when getting a new offering or feature out the door.

In the grand scheme, does anyone really expect software to be bug free or even fully functional on launch day? All customers know that the initial release is more of a prototype than a polished product and unless the want to get a feel for application they really should wait until the first or second patch is sent out. With that in mind, who is going care about the testing efforts done pre-release. Heck, we can even save money by letting the early adopters report any real issues found. They are going to be better suited to the task anyway since they are actually using the product rather than making up hypothetical uses. They are also more likely to follow the instructions for using the product and stay on the “happy path” rather than performing “Exploratory Testing”.

All in all, testing is completely overrated and unnecessary beyond the spot checks performed by the developers when they write the code. If anyone tells you otherwise, they are probably just whiny testers trying to feel like they matter, just ignore them.

 


The post above was written for April Fool’s Day and does not represent the actual opinion of the author or Wolvesbane Academy. If this article sounds like an opinion expressed by teammates or managers in your organization, I am so, so sorry for you.

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