Preventing Issues or Helping to Mitigate Risk

I recently read an article by Cassandra H. Leung claiming that promoting the idea that testers prevent issues is harming the “tester brand” by establishing unrealistic expectations for testers. My initial reaction was to think that she was crazy because testers do prevent issues if we are allowed to join the project early and influence development. After reading a bit farther, I realized that the latter part of that thought was what she was talking about. Testers can’t prevent issues if they are not allowed to be part of planning or their warnings go unheeded. Unfortunately, both of these scenarios are more common than teams would like to admit.

This revelation leads us to an identity crisis as we are forced to ask, “What should we being doing as testers?”.

Over the years, testers have been charged with many formidable tasks including: assuring quality, catching bugs, policing issues, preventing issues, enforcing acceptance criteria, etc. As a whole, we’ve done a fair job of achieving success despite having the odds stacked against us by these vague definitions. The reason we cannot be completely successful is that we rarely have the level of control needed to perform these tasks.

As thought-leaders continue to move quality considerations “left” and raise awareness of the need to have testers involved early in the process, the need for testers gets questioned. If developers are testing and product owners are writing tests in the form of acceptance criteria, testers need to properly define their role on the team. Since Quality is a team responsibility, we cannot claim it as our goal. My recommendation is to define the tester role as mitigating risk though observation and review of project quality considerations and conversations with the team.

This means that testers are not gatekeepers, defenders of quality, or even responsible for catching all of the bugs. It is our job to bring our unique perspective and abilities to the team and use them to minimize the risk of issues within an implementation.

I admit that this definition is still a bit vague but it is something that we can accomplish. Testers cannot control the quality developed into the product. Testers cannot prevent decisions that could result in issues down the road. Testers can raise concerns to the team and make sure that quality conversations occur so that everyone involved has the best information available to them before making a risky decision.

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