Using Page Objects

The quality of anything you build is going to be a reflection of the underlying infrastructure. This fact applies to temples and test code alike. You wouldn’t build a cathedral on a shoddy foundation, so why would you be willing to build a test suite using fragile coding practices?

Looking down a spiral staircase
Photo By Karl-Ludwig Poggemann

Good coding concepts and practices are not just for use in final applications. Those same ideas should be used when developing tests that will be used to confirm the application’s functionality. I recommend skipping the unit tests of the tests though, you do not want to go down that rabbit hole.

When developing test suites, it is a good idea to utilize encapsulation and abstraction. This will simplify the building of tests while simultaneously increasing code reuse and reducing the fragility of them. One method to achieve this is through the use of page objects. Continue reading Using Page Objects

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An Overview of the Selenium Suite

First Things First

For those unfamiliar with Selenium, it is a suite of open-source browser automation tools consisting of three main products: Selenium IDE, Selenium Server, and Selenium WebDriver. Selenium IDE is a Firefox plugin that can be used to record and playback tests. Selenium Server is a java application that is used to control browsers on remote machines and/or to create what is called a Selenium Grid. The final component of the suite is Selenium WebDriver, which is a browser automation API designed to create tests or perform other required tasks. Each of the suite components serves a specific purpose in a web tester’s toolbox although all of them may not be needed within an organization.

Continue reading An Overview of the Selenium Suite

What is Test Automation?

Since this is the first post for my blog, it seems appropriate to start by defining test automation and then adding some scope to rein it in. In the broadest of termstest automation is the process of consistently obtaining and verifying results with minimum (or no) human interactionThis means that the tests could be physical or virtual. An example of a physical test for a manufacturing environment would be a sorting machine that checks for over-sized or misshapen parts. In the virtual realm, automated tests come in numerous forms and functions such as unit, integration, regression, and performance. My personal experience lies predominantly with software so my posts will most frequently deal with that aspect of automation.

Continue reading What is Test Automation?